Extension testing

Introduction

As an Extension author, it likely that you may want to test your extension during its development. This chapter details how extension authors can set up automatic extension testing. We’ll do that with two examples. Both embed the given extension in a TYPO3 instance and run tests within this environment, both examples also configure Travis CI to execute tests. We’ll use Docker containers for test execution again and use an extension specific runTests.sh script for executing test setup and execution.

Scope

About this chapter and what it does not cover, first.

  • This documentation assumes an extension is tested with only one major core version. It does not support extension testing with multiple target core versions. Extensions that support multiple core versions at the same time in the same branch are not scope of this document. The core team encourages extension developers to have dedicated core branches per core version. This has various advantages, it is for instance easy to create deprecation free extensions this way.

    If you need test setups for an extension that supports multiple major core versions at the same time, you may run into trouble if using the typo3/testing-framework package. The development of that package is closely bound to core development and has a relatively high development speed. It does contain breaking patches per major core versions, but it should not contain breaking patches for existing major core branches. If you now set up testing using typo3/testing-framework with TYPO3 core version 9, it should not break within v9’s lifetime. But it is likely to break if you upgrade to version 10 or later and may need adaption in your extension codes or setup.

    If you are looking for test setups that support multiple core versions at once, nimut/testing-framework may better suit your needs. This is however out of scope for this chapter.

  • This documentation relies on TYPO3 core version 9 and higher. It is possible to run tests using older core versions and various extensions have done this before. This is however out of scope for this chapter.

  • We assume a Composer based setup. Extensions should provide a composer.json file anyway and using Composer for extension testing is quite convenient.

  • Similar to core testing, this documentation relies on docker and docker-compose. See the core testing requirements for more details.

  • We assume your extensions code is located within github and automatic testing is carried out using Travis CI. The integration of Travis CI into github is easy to set up with plenty of documentation already available. If your extensions code is located elsewhere or a different CI is used, this chapter may still be of use in helping you build a general understanding of the testing process.

General strategy

Third party extensions often rely on TYPO3 core extensions to add key functionality.

If a project needs a TYPO3 extension, it will add the required extension using composer require to its own root composer.json file. The extensions composer.json then specifies additional detail, for instance which PHP class namespaces it provides and where they can be found. This properly integrates the extension into the project and the project then “knows” the location of extension classes.

If we want to test extension code directly, we do a similar change: We turn the composer.json file of the extension into a root composer.json file . That file then serves two needs at the same time: It is used by projects that require the extension as a dependency and it is used as the root composer.json to specify dependencies turning the extension into a project on its own for testing. The latter allows us to set up a full TYPO3 environment in a sub folder of the extension and execute the tests within this sub folder.

Testing enetcache

The extension enetcache is a small extension that helps with frontend plugin based caches. It has been available as composer package and a TER extension for quite some time and is loosely maintained to keep up with current core versions. At the time of writing, it has three branches:

  • 1.2 compatible with core v7, released to TER as 1.x.y
  • 2 compatible with core v8, released to TER as 2.x.y
  • master compatible with core v9, released to TER as 3.x.y

Branch master will be branched later as 3 when core version 10 gains traction. This document focuses on the master / core v9 compatible branch. The extension comes with a couple of unit tests in Tests/Unit , we want to run these locally and in travis-ci, along with some PHP linting to verify there is no fatal PHP error. We’ll test that extension with both PHP 7.2 and PHP 7.3 - the two PHP versions TYPO3 core v9 currently supports at the time of writing.

Starting point

As outlined in the general strategy, we need to extend the existing composer.json file by adding some root composer.json specific things. This does not harm the functionality of the existing composer.json properties if the extension is a project dependency and not used as root composer.json: Root properties are ignored in composer if the file is not used as root project file, see the notes “root-only” of the composer documentation for details.

This is how the composer.json file looks before we add a test setup:

{
  "name": "lolli/enetcache",
  "type": "typo3-cms-extension",
  "description": "Enetcache cache extension",
  "homepage": "https://github.com/lolli42/enetcache",
  "authors": [
    {
      "name": "Christian Kuhn",
      "role": "Developer"
    }
  ],
  "license": [
    "GPL-2.0-or-later"
  ],
  "require": {
    "typo3/cms-core": "^9.5"
  },
  "autoload": {
    "psr-4": {
      "Lolli\\Enetcache\\": "Classes"
    }
  },
  "replace": {
    "enetcache": "self.version",
    "typo3-ter/enetcache": "self.version"
  },
  "extra": {
    "branch-alias": {
      "dev-master": "2.x-dev"
    },
    "typo3/cms": {
      "cms-package-dir": "{$vendor-dir}/typo3/cms",
    }
  }
}

This is a typical composer.json file without any complexity: It’s a typo3-cms-extension , with an author and a license. We are stating that “I need at least 9.5.0 of cms-core” and we tell the auto loader “find all class names starting with Lolli\Enetcache in the Classes/ directory”.

The extension already contains some unit tests that extend form typo3/testing-framework`s base unit test class in directory Tests/Unit/Hooks (stripped):

<?php
namespace Lolli\Enetcache\Tests\Unit\Hooks;

use TYPO3\TestingFramework\Core\Unit\UnitTestCase;

class DataHandlerFlushByTagHookTest extends UnitTestCase
{
    /**
     * @test
     */
    public function findReferencedDatabaseEntriesReturnsEmptyArrayForTcaWithoutRelations()
    {
        // some unit test code
    }
}

Preparing composer.json

Now let’s add our properties to put these tests into action. First, we add a series of properties to composer.json to add root composer.json details, turning the extension into a project at the same time:

{
  "name": "lolli/enetcache",
  "type": "typo3-cms-extension",
  "description": "Enetcache cache extension",
  "homepage": "https://github.com/lolli42/enetcache",
  "authors": [
    {
      "name": "Christian Kuhn",
      "role": "Developer"
    }
  ],
  "license": [
    "GPL-2.0-or-later"
  ],
  "require": {
    "typo3/cms-core": "^9.5"
  },
  "config": {
    "vendor-dir": ".Build/vendor",
    "bin-dir": ".Build/bin"
  },
  "require-dev": {
    "typo3/testing-framework": "^4.11.1"
  },
  "autoload": {
    "psr-4": {
      "Lolli\\Enetcache\\": "Classes"
    }
  },
  "autoload-dev": {
    "psr-4": {
      "Lolli\\Enetcache\\Tests\\": "Tests"
    }
  },
  "replace": {
    "enetcache": "self.version",
    "typo3-ter/enetcache": "self.version"
  },
  "scripts": {
    "post-autoload-dump": [
      "TYPO3\\TestingFramework\\Composer\\ExtensionTestEnvironment::prepare"
    ]
  },
  "extra": {
    "branch-alias": {
      "dev-master": "2.x-dev"
    },
    "typo3/cms": {
      "cms-package-dir": "{$vendor-dir}/typo3/cms",
      "web-dir": ".Build/Web",
      "extension-key": "enetcache"
    }
  }
}

Note all added properties are only used within our root composer.json files, they are ignored if the extension is loaded as a dependency in our project. Note: We specify .Build as build directory. This is where our TYPO3 instance will be set up. We add typo3/testing-framework in a v9 compatible version as require-dev dependency. We add a autoload-dev to tell composer that test classes are found in the Tests directory. In the scripts section we add a composer hook. This one is interesting. That class of the testing framework links the main directory as extension .Build/Web/typo3conf/ext/enetcache in our extension specific TYPO3 instance. It needs the two additional properties web-dir and extension-key to do that.

Now, before we start playing around with this setup, we instruct git to ignore runtime on-the-fly files. The .gitignore looks like this:

.Build/
.idea/
Build/testing-docker/.env
composer.lock

We ignore the entire .Build directory, these are on-the-fly files that do not belong to the extension functionality. We also ignore the .idea directory - this is a directory where PhpStorm stores its settings. We also ignore Build/testing-docker/.env - this is a test runtime file created by runTests.sh later. And we ignore the composer.lock file: We don’t specify our dependency versions and a composer install will later always fetch for instance the youngest core dependencies marked as compatible in our composer.json file.

Let’s clone that repository and call composer install (stripped):

lolli@apoc /var/www/local/git $ git clone git@github.com:lolli42/enetcache.git
Cloning into 'enetcache'...
X11 forwarding request failed on channel 0
remote: Enumerating objects: 76, done.
remote: Counting objects: 100% (76/76), done.
remote: Compressing objects: 100% (50/50), done.
remote: Total 952 (delta 34), reused 52 (delta 18), pack-reused 876
Receiving objects: 100% (952/952), 604.38 KiB | 1.48 MiB/s, done.
Resolving deltas: 100% (537/537), done.
lolli@apoc /var/www/local/git $ cd enetcache/
lolli@apoc /var/www/local/git/enetcache $ composer install
Loading composer repositories with package information
Updating dependencies (including require-dev)
Package operations: 75 installs, 0 updates, 0 removals
  - Installing typo3/cms-composer-installers (v2.2.1): Loading from cache
  ...
  - Installing typo3/testing-framework (4.11.1): Loading from cache
...
Writing lock file
Generating autoload files
Generating class alias map file
Inserting class alias loader into main autoload.php file
> TYPO3\TestingFramework\Composer\ExtensionTestEnvironment::prepare
lolli@apoc /var/www/local/git/enetcache $

To clean up any errors created at this point, we can always run rm -r .Build/ composer.lock later and call composer install again. We now have a basic TYPO3 instance in our .Build/ folder to execute our tests in:

lolli@apoc /var/www/local/git/enetcache $ cd .Build/
lolli@apoc /var/www/local/git/enetcache/.Build $ ls
bin  vendor  Web
lolli@apoc /var/www/local/git/enetcache/.Build $ ls Web/
index.php  typo3  typo3conf
lolli@apoc /var/www/local/git/enetcache/.Build $ ls Web/typo3/sysext/
backend  core  extbase  fluid  frontend  recordlist
lolli@apoc /var/www/local/git/enetcache/.Build $ ls -l Web/typo3conf/ext/
total 0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 lolli www-data 29 Nov  5 14:19 enetcache -> /var/www/local/git/enetcache/

The package typo3/testing-framework that we added as require-dev dependency has some basic core extensions set as dependency, we end up with the core extensions backend , core , extbase , fluid , frontend and recordlist in .Build/Web/typo3/sysext . Additionally, the ExtensionTestEnvironment hook linked our git root checkout as extension into .Build/Web/typo3conf/ext .

We now have a full TYPO3 instance. It is not installed, there is no database, but we are now at the point to begin unit testing!

runTests.sh and docker-compose.yml

Next we need to setup our tests. These are the two files we need: Build/Scripts/runTests.sh and Build/testing-docker/ docker-compose.yml .

These files are re-purposed from TYPO3’s core: core Build/Scripts/runTests.sh and core Build/testing-docker/local/ docker-compose.yml . You can copy and paste these files from extensions like enetcache or styleguide to your own extension, but you should then look through the files and adapt to your needs (for instance search for the word “enetcache” in runTests.sh).

Let’s run the tests:

lolli@apoc /var/www/local/git/enetcache $ Build/Scripts/runTests.sh
Creating network "local_default" with the default driver
PHP 7.2.11-3+ubuntu18.04.1+deb.sury.org+1 (cli) (built: Oct 25 2018 06:44:08) ( NTS )
PHPUnit 7.1.5 by Sebastian Bergmann and contributors.

.....SS                                                             7 / 7 (100%)

Time: 84 ms, Memory: 12.00MB

OK, but incomplete, skipped, or risky tests!
Tests: 7, Assertions: 56, Skipped: 2.
Removing local_unit_run_1 ... done
Removing network local_default

Done. That’s it. Execution of your extension`s unit tests.

On some versions of MacOS you might get the following error message when executing runTests.sh:

$ ./Build/Scripts/runTests.sh
readlink: illegal option -- f
usage: readlink [-n] [file ...]
Creating network "local_default" with the default driver
ERROR: Cannot create container for service unit: invalid volume specification: '.:.:rw':
invalid mount config for type "volume": invalid mount path: '.' mount path must be absolute
Removing network local_default

To solve this issue follow the steps described here to install greadlink which supports the needed –f option.

Rather than changing the runTests.sh to then use greadlink and thus risk breaking your automated testing via Travis CI consider symlinking your readlink executable to the newly installed greadlink with the following command as mentioned in the comments:

ln -s "$(which greadlink)" "$(dirname "$(which greadlink)")/readlink"

The runTests.sh file of enetcache comes with some additional features, for example it is possible to execute composer install from within a container using Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s composerInstall , it is possible to execute unit tests with PHP 7.3 instead of 7.2 (option -p 7.3 ). This is available for PHP linting, too ( -s lint ). Similar to core test execution it is possible to break point tests using xdebug ( -x option), typo3gmbh containers can be updated using runTests.sh -u , verbose output is available with -v and a help is available with runTests.sh -h . Have a look around.

Travis CI

With basic testing in place we now want automatic execution of tests whenever something is merged to the repository and if people create pull requests for our extension, we want to make sure our carefully crafted test setup actually work. We’ll use the continuous integration service Travis CI to take care of that. It’s free for open source projects. So, log in to travis using your github account. After login, the user settings page will list all your github repositories and travis-ci can be enabled with one click for single repositories. All we need is a .travis.yml file in the root directory of our extension telling travis-ci what exactly should be done:

language: php

php:
  - 7.2
  - 7.3

sudo: true

cache:
  directories:
    - $HOME/.composer/cache

before_script:
  - Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s composerInstall -p $TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION

script:
  - >
    echo "Running composer validate"
    Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s composerValidate -p $TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION
  - >
    echo "Running unit tests";
    Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s unit -p $TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION
  - >
    echo "Running php lint";
    Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s lint -p $TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION

In case of enetcache, we let Travis CI test the extension with the two PHP versions 7.2 and 7.3. Travis exposes the current version as the variable $TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION , so we use that to feed it to runTests.sh . We instruct Travis to always composer install first, then run the test suites composer validate , the unit testing and the PHP linting. It’s possible to see executed test runs online . Green :) Maybe it’s now time to add the travis-ci status badge to our README.md file.

Note we again use runTests.sh to actually run tests. So the environment our tests are executed in is identical to our local environment. It’s all dockerized. We don’t care about the PHP versions travis-ci loaded and installed for us. Travis CI needs the setting sudo: true to allow starting own containers, though.

Travis CI comes with many additional options and possibilities. If for instance we want to run multiple jobs in parallel check out Travis’ Build Stages feature .

Testing styleguide

The above enetcache extension is an example for a common extension that has few testing needs: It just comes with a couple of unit tests. Executing these and maybe adding PHP linting is recommended. More ambitious testing needs additional effort. As an example, we pick the styleguide extension. This extension is developed “core near”, core itself uses styleguide to test various FormEngine details with acceptance tests and if developing core, that extension is installed as a dependency by default. However, styleguide is just a casual extension: It is released to composer’s packagist.org and can be loaded as dependency (or require-dev dependency) in any project.

The styleguide extension follows the core branching principle, too: At the time of this writing, it’s “master” branch is dedicated to be compatible with core version 9. This will change later if core v10 gains traction, and there are branches compatible with older core versions.

In comparison to enetcache, styleguide comes with additional test suites: It has functional and acceptance tests! Our goal is to run the functional tests with different database platforms, and to execute the acceptance tests. Both locally and on travis-ci and with different PHP versions.

Basic setup

The setup is similar to what has been outlined in detail with enetcache above: We add properties to the composer.json file to make it a valid root composer.json defining a project. The require-dev section is a bit longer as we also need codeception to run acceptance tests and specify a couple of additional core extensions for a basic TYPO3 instance. We additionally add an app-dir directive in the extra section.

Next, we have another iteration of runTests.sh and docker-compose.yml that are longer than the versions of enetcache to handle the functional and acceptance tests setups, too.

With this in place we can run unit tests:

git clone git@github.com:TYPO3/styleguide.git
cd styleguide
Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s composerInstall
# Run unit tests
Build/Scripts/runTests.sh
# ... OK (1 test, 4 assertions)

Functional testing

At the time writing, there is only a single functional test, but this one is important as it tests crucial functionality within styleguide: The extension comes with several different TCA scenarios to show all sorts of database relation and field possibilities supported within TYPO3. To simplify testing, code can generate a page tree and demo data for all of these scenarios. Codewise, this is a huge section of the extension and it uses quite some core API to do its job. And yes, the generator breaks once in a while. A perfect scenario for a functional test! (slightly stripped):

<?php
namespace TYPO3\CMS\Styleguide\Tests\Functional\TcaDataGenerator;

use TYPO3\CMS\Core\Core\Bootstrap;
use TYPO3\CMS\Styleguide\TcaDataGenerator\Generator;
use TYPO3\TestingFramework\Core\Functional\FunctionalTestCase;

/**
 * Test case
 */
class GeneratorTest extends FunctionalTestCase
{
    /**
     * @var array Have styleguide loaded
     */
    protected $testExtensionsToLoad = [
        'typo3conf/ext/styleguide',
    ];

    /**
     * Just a dummy to show that at least one test is actually executed on mssql
     *
     * @test
     */
    public function dummy()
    {
        $this->assertTrue(true);
    }

    /**
     * @test
     * @group not-mssql
     * @todo Generator does not work using mssql DMBS yet ... fix this
     */
    public function generatorCreatesBasicRecord()
    {
        // styleguide generator uses DataHandler for some parts. DataHandler needs an
        // initialized BE user with admin right and the live workspace.
        Bootstrap::initializeBackendUser();
        $GLOBALS['BE_USER']->user['admin'] = 1;
        $GLOBALS['BE_USER']->user['uid'] = 1;
        $GLOBALS['BE_USER']->workspace = 0;
        Bootstrap::initializeLanguageObject();

        // Verify there is no tx_styleguide_elements_basic yet
        $queryBuilder = $this->getConnectionPool()->getQueryBuilderForTable('tx_styleguide_elements_basic');
        $queryBuilder->getRestrictions()->removeAll();
        $count = $queryBuilder->count('uid')
            ->from('tx_styleguide_elements_basic')
            ->execute()
            ->fetchColumn(0);
        $this->assertEquals(0, $count);

        $generator = new Generator();
        $generator->create();

        // Verify there is at least one tx_styleguide_elements_basic record now
        $queryBuilder = $this->getConnectionPool()->getQueryBuilderForTable('tx_styleguide_elements_basic');
        $queryBuilder->getRestrictions()->removeAll();
        $count = $queryBuilder->count('uid')
            ->from('tx_styleguide_elements_basic')
            ->execute()
            ->fetchColumn(0);
        $this->assertGreaterThan(0, $count);
    }
}

Ah, shame on us! The data generator does not work well if executed using MSSQL as our DBMS. It is thus marked as @group not-mssql at the moment. We need to fix that at some point. The rest is rather straight forward: We extend from TYPO3\TestingFramework\Core\Functional\FunctionalTestCase , instruct it to load the styleguide extension ( $testExtensionsToLoad ), need some additional magic for the DataHandler, then call $generator->create(); and verify it created at least one record in one of our database tables. That’s it. It executes fine using runTests.sh:

lolli@apoc /var/www/local/git/styleguide $ Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s functional
Creating network "local_default" with the default driver
Creating local_mariadb10_1 ... done
Waiting for database start...
Database is up
PHP 7.2.11-3+ubuntu18.04.1+deb.sury.org+1 (cli) (built: Oct 25 2018 06:44:08) ( NTS )
PHPUnit 7.1.5 by Sebastian Bergmann and contributors.

..                                                                  2 / 2 (100%)

Time: 5.23 seconds, Memory: 28.00MB

OK (2 tests, 3 assertions)
Stopping local_mariadb10_1 ... done
Removing local_functional_mariadb10_run_1 ... done
Removing local_mariadb10_1                ... done
Removing network local_default
lolli@apoc /var/www/local/git/styleguide $

The good thing about this test is that it actually triggers quite some functionality below. It does tons of database inserts and updates and uses the core DataHandler for various details. If something goes wrong in this entire area, it would throw an exception, the functional test would recognize this and fail. But if its green, we know that a large parts of that extension are working correctly.

If looking at details - for instance if we try to fix the MSSQL issue - runTests.sh can be called with -x again for xdebug break pointing. Also, the functional test execution becomes a bit funny: We are creating a TYPO3 test instance within .Build/ folder anyway. But the functional test setup again creates instances for the single tests cases. The code that is actually executed is now located in a sub folder of typo3temp/ of .Build/ , in this test case it is functional-9ad521a :

lolli@apoc /var/www/local/git/styleguide $ ls -l .Build/Web/typo3temp/var/tests/functional-9ad521a/
total 16
drwxr-sr-x 4 lolli www-data 4096 Nov  5 17:35 fileadmin
lrwxrwxrwx 1 lolli www-data   50 Nov  5 17:35 index.php -> /var/www/local/git/styleguide/.Build/Web/index.php
lrwxrwxrwx 1 lolli www-data   46 Nov  5 17:35 typo3 -> /var/www/local/git/styleguide/.Build/Web/typo3
drwxr-sr-x 4 lolli www-data 4096 Nov  5 17:35 typo3conf
lrwxrwxrwx 1 lolli www-data   40 Nov  5 17:35 typo3_src -> /var/www/local/git/styleguide/.Build/Web
drwxr-sr-x 4 lolli www-data 4096 Nov  5 17:35 typo3temp
drwxr-sr-x 2 lolli www-data 4096 Nov  5 17:35 uploads

This can be confusing at first, but it starts making sense the more you use it. Also, the docker-compose.yml file contains a setup to start needed databases for the functional tests and runTests.sh is tuned to call the different scenarios.

Acceptance testing

Not enough! The styleguide extension adds a module to the TYPO3 backend to the Topbar > Help section. Next to other things, this module adds buttons to create and delete the demo data that has been functional tested above already. To verify this works in the backend as well, styleguide comes with some straight acceptance tests in Tests/Acceptance/Backend/ModuleCest :

<?php
declare(strict_types = 1);
namespace TYPO3\CMS\Styleguide\Tests\Acceptance\Backend;

use TYPO3\CMS\Styleguide\Tests\Acceptance\Support\BackendTester;
use TYPO3\TestingFramework\Core\Acceptance\Helper\Topbar;

/**
 * Tests the styleguide backend module can be loaded
 */
class ModuleCest
{
    /**
     * Selector for the module container in the topbar
     *
     * @var string
     */
    public static $topBarModuleSelector = '#typo3-cms-backend-backend-toolbaritems-helptoolbaritem';

    /**
     * @param BackendTester $I
     */
    public function _before(BackendTester $I)
    {
        $I->useExistingSession('admin');
    }

    /**
     * @param BackendTester $I
     */
    public function styleguideInTopbarHelpCanBeCalled(BackendTester $I)
    {
        $I->click(Topbar::$dropdownToggleSelector, self::$topBarModuleSelector);
        $I->canSee('Styleguide', self::$topBarModuleSelector);
        $I->click('Styleguide', self::$topBarModuleSelector);
        $I->switchToContentFrame();
        $I->see('TYPO3 CMS Backend Styleguide', 'h1');
    }

    /**
     * @depends styleguideInTopbarHelpCanBeCalled
     * @param BackendTester $I
     */
    public function creatingDemoDataWorks(BackendTester $I)
    {
        $I->click(Topbar::$dropdownToggleSelector, self::$topBarModuleSelector);
        $I->canSee('Styleguide', self::$topBarModuleSelector);
        $I->click('Styleguide', self::$topBarModuleSelector);
        $I->switchToContentFrame();
        $I->see('TYPO3 CMS Backend Styleguide', 'h1');
        $I->click('TCA / Records');
        $I->waitForText('TCA test records');
        $I->click('Create styleguide page tree with data');
        $I->waitForText('A page tree with styleguide TCA test records was created.', 300);
    }

    /**
     * @depends creatingDemoDataWorks
     * @param BackendTester $I
     */
    public function deletingDemoDataWorks(BackendTester $I)
    {
        $I->click(Topbar::$dropdownToggleSelector, self::$topBarModuleSelector);
        $I->canSee('Styleguide', self::$topBarModuleSelector);
        $I->click('Styleguide', self::$topBarModuleSelector);
        $I->switchToContentFrame();
        $I->see('TYPO3 CMS Backend Styleguide', 'h1');
        $I->click('TCA / Records');
        $I->waitForText('TCA test records');
        $I->click('Delete styleguide page tree and all styleguide data records');
        $I->waitForText('The styleguide page tree and all styleguide records were deleted.', 300);
    }
}

There are three tests: One verifies the backend module can be called, one creates demo data, the last one deletes demo data again. The codeception setup needs a bit more attention to setup, though. The entry point is the main codeception.yml file extended by the backend suite , a backend tester and a codeception bootstrap extension that instructs the basic typo3/testing-framework acceptance bootstrap to load the styleguide extension and have some database fixtures included to easily log in to the backend. Additionally, the runTests.sh and docker-compose.yml files take care of adding selenium-chrome and a web server to actually execute the tests:

lolli@apoc /var/www/local/git/styleguide $ Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s acceptance
Creating network "local_default" with the default driver
Creating local_chrome_1    ... done
Creating local_web_1       ... done
Creating local_mariadb10_1 ... done
Waiting for database start...
Database is up
Codeception PHP Testing Framework v2.5.1
Powered by PHPUnit 7.1.5 by Sebastian Bergmann and contributors.
Running with seed:


  Generating BackendTesterActions...

TYPO3\CMS\Styleguide\Tests\Acceptance\Support.Backend Tests (3) -------------------------------------------------------
Modules: WebDriver, \TYPO3\TestingFramework\Core\Acceptance\Helper\Acceptance, \TYPO3\TestingFramework\Core\Acceptance\Helper\Login, Asserts
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
⏺ Recording ⏺ step-by-step screenshots will be saved to /var/www/local/git/styleguide/Tests/../.Build/Web/typo3temp/var/tests/AcceptanceReports/
Directory Format: record_5be078fb43f86_{filename}_{testname} ----

  Database Connection: {"Connections":{"Default":{"driver":"mysqli","dbname":"func_test_at","host":"mariadb10","user":"root","password":"funcp"}}}
  Loaded Extensions: ["core","extbase","fluid","backend","about","install","frontend","recordlist","typo3conf/ext/styleguide"]
ModuleCest: Styleguide in topbar help can be called

...

Time: 27.89 seconds, Memory: 28.00MB

OK (3 tests, 6 assertions)
Stopping local_mariadb10_1 ... done
Stopping local_chrome_1    ... done
Stopping local_web_1       ... done
Removing local_acceptance_backend_mariadb10_run_1 ... done
Removing local_mariadb10_1                        ... done
Removing local_chrome_1                           ... done
Removing local_web_1                              ... done
Removing network local_default

Ok, this setup is a bit more effort, but we end up with a browser automatically clicking things in an ad-hoc TYPO3 instance to verify this extension can perform its job. If something goes wrong, screenshots of the failed run can be found in .Build/Web/typo3temp/var/tests/AcceptanceReports/ .

travis-ci

Now we want all of this automatically checked using travis-ci:

language: php

php:
  - 7.2
  - 7.3

sudo: true

cache:
  directories:
    - $HOME/.composer/cache

notifications:
  email:
    recipients:
      - lolli@schwarzbu.ch
    on_success: change
    on_failure: change

before_script:
  - Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s composerInstall -p $TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION

script:
  - >
    echo "Running composer validate"
    Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s composerValidate -p $TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION
  - >
    echo "Running unit tests";
    Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s unit -p $TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION
  - >
    echo "Running php lint";
    Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s lint -p $TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION
  - >
    echo "Running functional tests with mariadb";
    Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s functional -d mariadb -p $TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION
  - >
    if [ ${TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION} = "7.2" ]; then
      echo "Running functional tests with mssql";
      Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s functional -d mssql -p $TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION;
    else
      echo "Running functional tests with mssql not supported with PHP 7.3 yet";
    fi
  - >
    echo "Running functional tests with postgres";
    Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s functional -d postgres -p $TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION
  - >
    echo "Running functional tests with sqlite";
    Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s functional -d sqlite -p $TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION
  - >
    echo "Running acceptance tests";
    Build/Scripts/runTests.sh -s acceptance -p $TRAVIS_PHP_VERSION

This is similar to the enetcache example, but does some more: The functional tests are executed with four different DBMS (MariaDB, MSSQL, Postgres, sqlite), and the acceptance tests are executed, too. This setup takes some time to complete on travis-ci. But, it’s green !